National Forum

The Corona Virus And Possible Effects To GAA Matches

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Replying To wishfulthinkin:  "wouldn't cost too much to stick up a few outdoor showers like the ones at beaches..or keep an eye on the weather and only train when it's dry. Why the concern about county trainings, club players have to drive over an hour too, it's a long way from dublin to the likes of longford, leitrim, cavan, etc"
Those club players surely have a 'home house in the parish they can get a shower in such as their parents house etc....that is why inter county is different in terms of showering after training....also distances for matches will be considerably longer in many cases so the logistics are a lot more difficult

ArmaghCat (Armagh) - Posts: 52 - 27/08/2020 08:58:33    2289313

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I wonder if Hoganstand could replace the red thumbs with an eye rolling emoji.

greysoil (Monaghan) - Posts: 786 - 27/08/2020 09:06:29    2289316

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Replying To maroondiesel:  "Meath were already relegated as far as I remember so off to div.2 with ya"
Not if it's null and void. :).

royaldunne (Meath) - Posts: 16724 - 27/08/2020 12:08:27    2289341

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Replying To greysoil:  "I wonder if Hoganstand could replace the red thumbs with an eye rolling emoji."
Or an updated forum alltogether with private messaging, ability to adapt pages to 10/20/30 posts per page like most other forums

KillingFields (Limerick) - Posts: 1371 - 27/08/2020 12:49:57    2289349

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Replying To royaldunne:  "Not if it's null and void. :)."
The league will be completed even it is in the new year and behind closed doors. Championship is another story.

maroondiesel (Mayo) - Posts: 1032 - 27/08/2020 15:03:00    2289370

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Replying To royaldunne:  "Not if it's null and void. :)."
I'm not sure if 2 years without any league victory would really help Meath.

MesAmis (Dublin) - Posts: 13086 - 27/08/2020 15:11:41    2289371

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Replying To MesAmis:  "I'm not sure if 2 years without any league victory would really help Meath."
Now now. Robbed in 2 games, and silly mistake left other one behind. My spidey senses tell me you may be worried

royaldunne (Meath) - Posts: 16724 - 27/08/2020 19:32:00    2289413

Link

With all of the focus currently aimed at the return of schools and the sharp intakes of breath concerning its prospects of success, the situation for third-level education hasn't yet triggered the same level of interest.

Given the widespread deployment of remote learning during the national lockdown and the expectation that it will continue to play a significant role in the sector, there is in parallel little clarity as to how third-level sport will function in this new reality.

The past academic year saw its sporting activities, like everything else, brought to a shuddering halt in mid-March and adjourned sine die.

This year, Brian Mullins - one of the most recognisable names in sport, as a key figure in Dublin's All-Ireland winning sides of the 1970s and '80s - marks 20 years as UCD's director of sport and he sees the landscape as too difficult to assess with any conviction, as coronavirus shows little sign of abating.

"I'm involved with an organisation, called Student Sport Ireland, which has 30-plus educational institutions in its membership. We're all just trying to plan for uncertainty and that means plans can change week to week and day to day. It will be at least the end of September before patterns emerge and adequate feedback gathered."

With students due to return on September 21st, at least a couple of weeks later than usual, there isn't the usual buzz of activity around campus and sports clubs have no firm idea of their likely intake.

"We'd normally have a week or two of recruitment activity when students sign up with clubs and we won't know until then if sufficient numbers have registered to make activities viable.

"It's an unclear picture. UCD are expecting 60 to 70 per cent of undergraduates or 80 per cent of postgraduates but I'm not sure where those numbers are going to come from."

Although several sports have resumed activities, there has been an impermanent feel to the schedules with the shadow of shutdowns, caused by Covid-19 infection, ever present.

Mullins can, however, point to some encouraging signs within UCD in recent weeks despite the ongoing difficulties and he believes that the specific attraction of sporting involvement may be a factor in attracting students to the university.

"There's definitely uncertainty about presence on campus but our rugby club here have been training for a number of weeks now and they're getting full turnouts and students preparing for the coming season are enjoying it and want to continue - no different to GAA clubs around the country. Everybody wants to play and everybody wants to be involved. Students are no different.

"Our soccer team are competing in the League of Ireland and fulfilling fixtures as normal and our famous Super League, which was cut short in March, has been picking up again and playing matches for the past couple of weeks.

"We anticipate that of all the reasons students might come to campus, participation in sport could well be significant driver."

On the national https://stvlive.co/ stage, debate about splitting the season between club and county has been dominating the non-pandemic conversation - even if the unplanned for trial played out this year in response to the restrictions of lockdown.

He's not inclined to day-dream about whether the notional new structure might benefit third-level Gaelic games by clearing more time at the start of the year even supposing the virus was to disappear in the morning.

"There's nothing going to be gone in the morning - or in a month. This pandemic is here to stay and as the WHO say, it'll be 18 months or two years before we're going to be able to plan normal activities."

Clearly sceptical about whether the split season will prove to be a panacea, he nonetheless welcomes the opportunity being taken to innovate.

"The pandemic has accommodated people improvising and thinking outside the box generally but I still think it's too early to say whether it's good or bad."
Merit of split season

Yet Mullins believes in the benefits of change and constant reappraisal.

"Back in the day when they introduced the back door and began tinkering with the All-Ireland series you got all sorts of people criticising and saying it was madness. I wasn't in that camp because I think change and adjusting is a good thing and I think those changes were good.

"Split season or dilution of the provincial championships, I don't have a strong opinion. I heard a discussion on the radio about the future of the provincial championships and my own view is that the extent to which change is possible while keeping them is debatable."

He has also had the opportunity for hands-on involvement as manager of St Vincent's footballers, who have reached the semi-finals of this year's championship, and appreciates the engagement that at one stage didn't seem possible.

"It was the only thing that was allowed and something that people welcomed in lockdown because it provided some light at the end of the tunnel. There were plenty of people doubting that it would get up and running the way it has. But I see this year as a temporary means of living with the pandemic in 2020 and that it's a once-off."

But did he not enjoy it with unhindered access to players and nice weather for a change?

"I've always enjoyed club activity! The way lockdown was going in April, we're lucky to have it."

stvlive (Cork) - Posts: 2 - 28/08/2020 15:46:14    2289513

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Replying To royaldunne:  "Now now. Robbed in 2 games, and silly mistake left other one behind. My spidey senses tell me you may be worried"
"robbed", "silly mistakes" and 0 points.

Indicative of how low Meath have fallen when you're resorting to excuses. Boylan's teams would not countenance such excuses.

Worried? Yeah I'd back Meath to at least quadruple their first half score in the Leinster final in the first half this year against the Dubs.

MesAmis (Dublin) - Posts: 13086 - 28/08/2020 16:22:51    2289519

Link

Replying To stvlive:  "With all of the focus currently aimed at the return of schools and the sharp intakes of breath concerning its prospects of success, the situation for third-level education hasn't yet triggered the same level of interest.

Given the widespread deployment of remote learning during the national lockdown and the expectation that it will continue to play a significant role in the sector, there is in parallel little clarity as to how third-level sport will function in this new reality.

The past academic year saw its sporting activities, like everything else, brought to a shuddering halt in mid-March and adjourned sine die.

This year, Brian Mullins - one of the most recognisable names in sport, as a key figure in Dublin's All-Ireland winning sides of the 1970s and '80s - marks 20 years as UCD's director of sport and he sees the landscape as too difficult to assess with any conviction, as coronavirus shows little sign of abating.

"I'm involved with an organisation, called Student Sport Ireland, which has 30-plus educational institutions in its membership. We're all just trying to plan for uncertainty and that means plans can change week to week and day to day. It will be at least the end of September before patterns emerge and adequate feedback gathered."

With students due to return on September 21st, at least a couple of weeks later than usual, there isn't the usual buzz of activity around campus and sports clubs have no firm idea of their likely intake.

"We'd normally have a week or two of recruitment activity when students sign up with clubs and we won't know until then if sufficient numbers have registered to make activities viable.

"It's an unclear picture. UCD are expecting 60 to 70 per cent of undergraduates or 80 per cent of postgraduates but I'm not sure where those numbers are going to come from."

Although several sports have resumed activities, there has been an impermanent feel to the schedules with the shadow of shutdowns, caused by Covid-19 infection, ever present.

Mullins can, however, point to some encouraging signs within UCD in recent weeks despite the ongoing difficulties and he believes that the specific attraction of sporting involvement may be a factor in attracting students to the university.

"There's definitely uncertainty about presence on campus but our rugby club here have been training for a number of weeks now and they're getting full turnouts and students preparing for the coming season are enjoying it and want to continue - no different to GAA clubs around the country. Everybody wants to play and everybody wants to be involved. Students are no different.

"Our soccer team are competing in the League of Ireland and fulfilling fixtures as normal and our famous Super League, which was cut short in March, has been picking up again and playing matches for the past couple of weeks.

"We anticipate that of all the reasons students might come to campus, participation in sport could well be significant driver."

On the national https://stvlive.co/ stage, debate about splitting the season between club and county has been dominating the non-pandemic conversation - even if the unplanned for trial played out this year in response to the restrictions of lockdown.

He's not inclined to day-dream about whether the notional new structure might benefit third-level Gaelic games by clearing more time at the start of the year even supposing the virus was to disappear in the morning.

"There's nothing going to be gone in the morning - or in a month. This pandemic is here to stay and as the WHO say, it'll be 18 months or two years before we're going to be able to plan normal activities."

Clearly sceptical about whether the split season will prove to be a panacea, he nonetheless welcomes the opportunity being taken to innovate.

"The pandemic has accommodated people improvising and thinking outside the box generally but I still think it's too early to say whether it's good or bad."
Merit of split season

Yet Mullins believes in the benefits of change and constant reappraisal.

"Back in the day when they introduced the back door and began tinkering with the All-Ireland series you got all sorts of people criticising and saying it was madness. I wasn't in that camp because I think change and adjusting is a good thing and I think those changes were good.

"Split season or dilution of the provincial championships, I don't have a strong opinion. I heard a discussion on the radio about the future of the provincial championships and my own view is that the extent to which change is possible while keeping them is debatable."

He has also had the opportunity for hands-on involvement as manager of St Vincent's footballers, who have reached the semi-finals of this year's championship, and appreciates the engagement that at one stage didn't seem possible.

"It was the only thing that was allowed and something that people welcomed in lockdown because it provided some light at the end of the tunnel. There were plenty of people doubting that it would get up and running the way it has. But I see this year as a temporary means of living with the pandemic in 2020 and that it's a once-off."

But did he not enjoy it with unhindered access to players and nice weather for a change?

"I've always enjoyed club activity! The way lockdown was going in April, we're lucky to have it.""
Great post. You'd wonder if some of the smaller Parishes or smaller Schools will recover at all. Some were limping along already before the Virus due to emigration, soccer, rugby, Aussie Rules, etc.

Trump2020 (Galway) - Posts: 1019 - 28/08/2020 17:45:37    2289538

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Replying To royaldunne:  "Now now. Robbed in 2 games, and silly mistake left other one behind. My spidey senses tell me you may be worried"
I like you as a poster and I know we can all have some blind loyalty towards our county, some more than others, but I don't think we've (Dublin) seen a whole lot from Meath to be worried about and I think your prediction you made when McEntee came in of winning a Leinster title within 3/4 or years(I think) was a bit of an overstatement. I don't think Meath will ever win a Leinster under McEntee, in my opinion.

Dubsfan28 (Dublin) - Posts: 2305 - 30/08/2020 09:57:44    2289736

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Replying To Dubsfan28:  "I like you as a poster and I know we can all have some blind loyalty towards our county, some more than others, but I don't think we've (Dublin) seen a whole lot from Meath to be worried about and I think your prediction you made when McEntee came in of winning a Leinster title within 3/4 or years(I think) was a bit of an overstatement. I don't think Meath will ever win a Leinster under McEntee, in my opinion."
In fairness Royal Dunne is an optimist that doesn't begrudgingly blame Meath's lack of success on how fantastically well this great Dublin team did under Jim Gavin. I agree with you that they probably won't win Leinster under McEntee but they've recently playing in Super 8s and Division One, albeit finding that level tough, combined with Gavin leaving and Jack O'Connor taking over Kildare the Leinster landscape might be shaken up in the roaring 20s! That's if the provincial are even around until the end of the 20s.

GreenandRed (Mayo) - Posts: 5873 - 30/08/2020 11:26:23    2289745

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Replying To Dubsfan28:  "I like you as a poster and I know we can all have some blind loyalty towards our county, some more than others, but I don't think we've (Dublin) seen a whole lot from Meath to be worried about and I think your prediction you made when McEntee came in of winning a Leinster title within 3/4 or years(I think) was a bit of an overstatement. I don't think Meath will ever win a Leinster under McEntee, in my opinion."
Entitled to ur opinion. Look when Andy took over we were pretty much rudderless, has thing's gone as quickly as he or I or anyone in Meath would have liked ? Nope. But we getting there. He has introduced new young players while slowly moving on. Unlike the chop and change that put us in this position in first place. Keoghan has gotten better which very few thought he could, menton came back and is now a proper midfielder, Newman has also recaptured his game, Conlon (19) walsh (18) been brought in at them ages and are been slowly turned into first team starters. Campion same, McGill and lavin are two of the top defenders in country. We still have a major goalkeeping problem in the form of kick outs. Without doubt that is the number one issue that needs to be sorted. Going forward we will get there under Andy. It may take another year or two. But we are getting there.

royaldunne (Meath) - Posts: 16724 - 30/08/2020 12:44:47    2289754

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Replying To GreenandRed:  "In fairness Royal Dunne is an optimist that doesn't begrudgingly blame Meath's lack of success on how fantastically well this great Dublin team did under Jim Gavin. I agree with you that they probably won't win Leinster under McEntee but they've recently playing in Super 8s and Division One, albeit finding that level tough, combined with Gavin leaving and Jack O'Connor taking over Kildare the Leinster landscape might be shaken up in the roaring 20s! That's if the provincial are even around until the end of the 20s."
Well that's it. I am and will remain a eternal optimist.

royaldunne (Meath) - Posts: 16724 - 30/08/2020 16:51:37    2289779

Link

Replying To stvlive:  "With all of the focus currently aimed at the return of schools and the sharp intakes of breath concerning its prospects of success, the situation for third-level education hasn't yet triggered the same level of interest.

Given the widespread deployment of remote learning during the national lockdown and the expectation that it will continue to play a significant role in the sector, there is in parallel little clarity as to how third-level sport will function in this new reality.

The past academic year saw its sporting activities, like everything else, brought to a shuddering halt in mid-March and adjourned sine die.

This year, Brian Mullins - one of the most recognisable names in sport, as a key figure in Dublin's All-Ireland winning sides of the 1970s and '80s - marks 20 years as UCD's director of sport and he sees the landscape as too difficult to assess with any conviction, as coronavirus shows little sign of abating.

"I'm involved with an organisation, called Student Sport Ireland, which has 30-plus educational institutions in its membership. We're all just trying to plan for uncertainty and that means plans can change week to week and day to day. It will be at least the end of September before patterns emerge and adequate feedback gathered."

With students due to return on September 21st, at least a couple of weeks later than usual, there isn't the usual buzz of activity around campus and sports clubs have no firm idea of their likely intake.

"We'd normally have a week or two of recruitment activity when students sign up with clubs and we won't know until then if sufficient numbers have registered to make activities viable.

"It's an unclear picture. UCD are expecting 60 to 70 per cent of undergraduates or 80 per cent of postgraduates but I'm not sure where those numbers are going to come from."

Although several sports have resumed activities, there has been an impermanent feel to the schedules with the shadow of shutdowns, caused by Covid-19 infection, ever present.

Mullins can, however, point to some encouraging signs within UCD in recent weeks despite the ongoing difficulties and he believes that the specific attraction of sporting involvement may be a factor in attracting students to the university.

"There's definitely uncertainty about presence on campus but our rugby club here have been training for a number of weeks now and they're getting full turnouts and students preparing for the coming season are enjoying it and want to continue - no different to GAA clubs around the country. Everybody wants to play and everybody wants to be involved. Students are no different.

"Our soccer team are competing in the League of Ireland and fulfilling fixtures as normal and our famous Super League, which was cut short in March, has been picking up again and playing matches for the past couple of weeks.

"We anticipate that of all the reasons students might come to campus, participation in sport could well be significant driver."

On the national https://stvlive.co/ stage, debate about splitting the season between club and county has been dominating the non-pandemic conversation - even if the unplanned for trial played out this year in response to the restrictions of lockdown.

He's not inclined to day-dream about whether the notional new structure might benefit third-level Gaelic games by clearing more time at the start of the year even supposing the virus was to disappear in the morning.

"There's nothing going to be gone in the morning - or in a month. This pandemic is here to stay and as the WHO say, it'll be 18 months or two years before we're going to be able to plan normal activities."

Clearly sceptical about whether the split season will prove to be a panacea, he nonetheless welcomes the opportunity being taken to innovate.

"The pandemic has accommodated people improvising and thinking outside the box generally but I still think it's too early to say whether it's good or bad."
Merit of split season

Yet Mullins believes in the benefits of change and constant reappraisal.

"Back in the day when they introduced the back door and began tinkering with the All-Ireland series you got all sorts of people criticising and saying it was madness. I wasn't in that camp because I think change and adjusting is a good thing and I think those changes were good.

"Split season or dilution of the provincial championships, I don't have a strong opinion. I heard a discussion on the radio about the future of the provincial championships and my own view is that the extent to which change is possible while keeping them is debatable."

He has also had the opportunity for hands-on involvement as manager of St Vincent's footballers, who have reached the semi-finals of this year's championship, and appreciates the engagement that at one stage didn't seem possible.

"It was the only thing that was allowed and something that people welcomed in lockdown because it provided some light at the end of the tunnel. There were plenty of people doubting that it would get up and running the way it has. But I see this year as a temporary means of living with the pandemic in 2020 and that it's a once-off."

But did he not enjoy it with unhindered access to players and nice weather for a change?

"I've always enjoyed club activity! The way lockdown was going in April, we're lucky to have it.""
Bar Cricket all BUCS in the UK have been suspended until January. Thats not to say that training will not happen and challenge games etc won't happen but the leagues won't start until second term. That I believe for the current year may very well be what will happen in Ireland for Universities with the GAA. However I get the sense that once club activity is completed the GAA will shut down all club games and training but what they do with Third Level is another matter. The season this year suits Uni activity only starting in Jan given the inter-county is not due to finish until December.
Creating a window for Third Level in Jan Feb may also throw open the question as to what is value of the leagues in the first term. Would they be better focused on inter faculty competitions and building participation in the GAA in the college as opposed to an Elite level focus straight away. The challenge would be say what about hurling in LIT, perhaps its playing 7s with its closest colleges? there are challenges to the concept but all the colleges have been as guilty as focusing on the Elite in GAA perhaps also its time to create a balance within and encourage participation which could help reduce dropout numbers.

zinny (Wexford) - Posts: 955 - 31/08/2020 07:59:03    2289876

Link

Replying To zinny:  "
Replying To stvlive:  "With all of the focus currently aimed at the return of schools and the sharp intakes of breath concerning its prospects of success, the situation for third-level education hasn't yet triggered the same level of interest.

Given the widespread deployment of remote learning during the national lockdown and the expectation that it will continue to play a significant role in the sector, there is in parallel little clarity as to how third-level sport will function in this new reality.

The past academic year saw its sporting activities, like everything else, brought to a shuddering halt in mid-March and adjourned sine die.

This year, Brian Mullins - one of the most recognisable names in sport, as a key figure in Dublin's All-Ireland winning sides of the 1970s and '80s - marks 20 years as UCD's director of sport and he sees the landscape as too difficult to assess with any conviction, as coronavirus shows little sign of abating.

"I'm involved with an organisation, called Student Sport Ireland, which has 30-plus educational institutions in its membership. We're all just trying to plan for uncertainty and that means plans can change week to week and day to day. It will be at least the end of September before patterns emerge and adequate feedback gathered."

With students due to return on September 21st, at least a couple of weeks later than usual, there isn't the usual buzz of activity around campus and sports clubs have no firm idea of their likely intake.

"We'd normally have a week or two of recruitment activity when students sign up with clubs and we won't know until then if sufficient numbers have registered to make activities viable.

"It's an unclear picture. UCD are expecting 60 to 70 per cent of undergraduates or 80 per cent of postgraduates but I'm not sure where those numbers are going to come from."

Although several sports have resumed activities, there has been an impermanent feel to the schedules with the shadow of shutdowns, caused by Covid-19 infection, ever present.

Mullins can, however, point to some encouraging signs within UCD in recent weeks despite the ongoing difficulties and he believes that the specific attraction of sporting involvement may be a factor in attracting students to the university.

"There's definitely uncertainty about presence on campus but our rugby club here have been training for a number of weeks now and they're getting full turnouts and students preparing for the coming season are enjoying it and want to continue - no different to GAA clubs around the country. Everybody wants to play and everybody wants to be involved. Students are no different.

"Our soccer team are competing in the League of Ireland and fulfilling fixtures as normal and our famous Super League, which was cut short in March, has been picking up again and playing matches for the past couple of weeks.

"We anticipate that of all the reasons students might come to campus, participation in sport could well be significant driver."

On the national https://stvlive.co/ stage, debate about splitting the season between club and county has been dominating the non-pandemic conversation - even if the unplanned for trial played out this year in response to the restrictions of lockdown.

He's not inclined to day-dream about whether the notional new structure might benefit third-level Gaelic games by clearing more time at the start of the year even supposing the virus was to disappear in the morning.

"There's nothing going to be gone in the morning - or in a month. This pandemic is here to stay and as the WHO say, it'll be 18 months or two years before we're going to be able to plan normal activities."

Clearly sceptical about whether the split season will prove to be a panacea, he nonetheless welcomes the opportunity being taken to innovate.

"The pandemic has accommodated people improvising and thinking outside the box generally but I still think it's too early to say whether it's good or bad."
Merit of split season

Yet Mullins believes in the benefits of change and constant reappraisal.

"Back in the day when they introduced the back door and began tinkering with the All-Ireland series you got all sorts of people criticising and saying it was madness. I wasn't in that camp because I think change and adjusting is a good thing and I think those changes were good.

"Split season or dilution of the provincial championships, I don't have a strong opinion. I heard a discussion on the radio about the future of the provincial championships and my own view is that the extent to which change is possible while keeping them is debatable."

He has also had the opportunity for hands-on involvement as manager of St Vincent's footballers, who have reached the semi-finals of this year's championship, and appreciates the engagement that at one stage didn't seem possible.

"It was the only thing that was allowed and something that people welcomed in lockdown because it provided some light at the end of the tunnel. There were plenty of people doubting that it would get up and running the way it has. But I see this year as a temporary means of living with the pandemic in 2020 and that it's a once-off."

But did he not enjoy it with unhindered access to players and nice weather for a change?

"I've always enjoyed club activity! The way lockdown was going in April, we're lucky to have it.""
Bar Cricket all BUCS in the UK have been suspended until January. Thats not to say that training will not happen and challenge games etc won't happen but the leagues won't start until second term. That I believe for the current year may very well be what will happen in Ireland for Universities with the GAA. However I get the sense that once club activity is completed the GAA will shut down all club games and training but what they do with Third Level is another matter. The season this year suits Uni activity only starting in Jan given the inter-county is not due to finish until December.
Creating a window for Third Level in Jan Feb may also throw open the question as to what is value of the leagues in the first term. Would they be better focused on inter faculty competitions and building participation in the GAA in the college as opposed to an Elite level focus straight away. The challenge would be say what about hurling in LIT, perhaps its playing 7s with its closest colleges? there are challenges to the concept but all the colleges have been as guilty as focusing on the Elite in GAA perhaps also its time to create a balance within and encourage participation which could help reduce dropout numbers."
What is/are BUCS?

Cockney_Cat (UK) - Posts: 1047 - 31/08/2020 10:57:09    2289909

Link

Replying To Cockney_Cat:  "
Replying To zinny:  "[quote=stvlive:  "With all of the focus currently aimed at the return of schools and the sharp intakes of breath concerning its prospects of success, the situation for third-level education hasn't yet triggered the same level of interest.

Given the widespread deployment of remote learning during the national lockdown and the expectation that it will continue to play a significant role in the sector, there is in parallel little clarity as to how third-level sport will function in this new reality.

The past academic year saw its sporting activities, like everything else, brought to a shuddering halt in mid-March and adjourned sine die.

This year, Brian Mullins - one of the most recognisable names in sport, as a key figure in Dublin's All-Ireland winning sides of the 1970s and '80s - marks 20 years as UCD's director of sport and he sees the landscape as too difficult to assess with any conviction, as coronavirus shows little sign of abating.

"I'm involved with an organisation, called Student Sport Ireland, which has 30-plus educational institutions in its membership. We're all just trying to plan for uncertainty and that means plans can change week to week and day to day. It will be at least the end of September before patterns emerge and adequate feedback gathered."

With students due to return on September 21st, at least a couple of weeks later than usual, there isn't the usual buzz of activity around campus and sports clubs have no firm idea of their likely intake.

"We'd normally have a week or two of recruitment activity when students sign up with clubs and we won't know until then if sufficient numbers have registered to make activities viable.

"It's an unclear picture. UCD are expecting 60 to 70 per cent of undergraduates or 80 per cent of postgraduates but I'm not sure where those numbers are going to come from."

Although several sports have resumed activities, there has been an impermanent feel to the schedules with the shadow of shutdowns, caused by Covid-19 infection, ever present.

Mullins can, however, point to some encouraging signs within UCD in recent weeks despite the ongoing difficulties and he believes that the specific attraction of sporting involvement may be a factor in attracting students to the university.

"There's definitely uncertainty about presence on campus but our rugby club here have been training for a number of weeks now and they're getting full turnouts and students preparing for the coming season are enjoying it and want to continue - no different to GAA clubs around the country. Everybody wants to play and everybody wants to be involved. Students are no different.

"Our soccer team are competing in the League of Ireland and fulfilling fixtures as normal and our famous Super League, which was cut short in March, has been picking up again and playing matches for the past couple of weeks.

"We anticipate that of all the reasons students might come to campus, participation in sport could well be significant driver."

On the national https://stvlive.co/ stage, debate about splitting the season between club and county has been dominating the non-pandemic conversation - even if the unplanned for trial played out this year in response to the restrictions of lockdown.

He's not inclined to day-dream about whether the notional new structure might benefit third-level Gaelic games by clearing more time at the start of the year even supposing the virus was to disappear in the morning.

"There's nothing going to be gone in the morning - or in a month. This pandemic is here to stay and as the WHO say, it'll be 18 months or two years before we're going to be able to plan normal activities."

Clearly sceptical about whether the split season will prove to be a panacea, he nonetheless welcomes the opportunity being taken to innovate.

"The pandemic has accommodated people improvising and thinking outside the box generally but I still think it's too early to say whether it's good or bad."
Merit of split season

Yet Mullins believes in the benefits of change and constant reappraisal.

"Back in the day when they introduced the back door and began tinkering with the All-Ireland series you got all sorts of people criticising and saying it was madness. I wasn't in that camp because I think change and adjusting is a good thing and I think those changes were good.

"Split season or dilution of the provincial championships, I don't have a strong opinion. I heard a discussion on the radio about the future of the provincial championships and my own view is that the extent to which change is possible while keeping them is debatable."

He has also had the opportunity for hands-on involvement as manager of St Vincent's footballers, who have reached the semi-finals of this year's championship, and appreciates the engagement that at one stage didn't seem possible.

"It was the only thing that was allowed and something that people welcomed in lockdown because it provided some light at the end of the tunnel. There were plenty of people doubting that it would get up and running the way it has. But I see this year as a temporary means of living with the pandemic in 2020 and that it's a once-off."

But did he not enjoy it with unhindered access to players and nice weather for a change?

"I've always enjoyed club activity! The way lockdown was going in April, we're lucky to have it.""
Bar Cricket all BUCS in the UK have been suspended until January. Thats not to say that training will not happen and challenge games etc won't happen but the leagues won't start until second term. That I believe for the current year may very well be what will happen in Ireland for Universities with the GAA. However I get the sense that once club activity is completed the GAA will shut down all club games and training but what they do with Third Level is another matter. The season this year suits Uni activity only starting in Jan given the inter-county is not due to finish until December.
Creating a window for Third Level in Jan Feb may also throw open the question as to what is value of the leagues in the first term. Would they be better focused on inter faculty competitions and building participation in the GAA in the college as opposed to an Elite level focus straight away. The challenge would be say what about hurling in LIT, perhaps its playing 7s with its closest colleges? there are challenges to the concept but all the colleges have been as guilty as focusing on the Elite in GAA perhaps also its time to create a balance within and encourage participation which could help reduce dropout numbers."
What is/are BUCS?"]British Universities & Colleges Sports. Its the governing body that covers all Third Level Sports in the UK. Its a pretty good concept. Each sports organisation runs their own competitions within it but have to fit into a certain criteria and at the end of each year there is an overall winner when all sports are taken into account. One website where all fixtures etc are on. Its one thing I think the Unis & Colleges in Ireland could look at copying.

zinny (Wexford) - Posts: 955 - 31/08/2020 11:52:51    2289917

Link

Replying To zinny:  "
Replying To Cockney_Cat:  "[quote=zinny:  "[quote=stvlive:  "With all of the focus currently aimed at the return of schools and the sharp intakes of breath concerning its prospects of success, the situation for third-level education hasn't yet triggered the same level of interest.

Given the widespread deployment of remote learning during the national lockdown and the expectation that it will continue to play a significant role in the sector, there is in parallel little clarity as to how third-level sport will function in this new reality.

The past academic year saw its sporting activities, like everything else, brought to a shuddering halt in mid-March and adjourned sine die.

This year, Brian Mullins - one of the most recognisable names in sport, as a key figure in Dublin's All-Ireland winning sides of the 1970s and '80s - marks 20 years as UCD's director of sport and he sees the landscape as too difficult to assess with any conviction, as coronavirus shows little sign of abating.

"I'm involved with an organisation, called Student Sport Ireland, which has 30-plus educational institutions in its membership. We're all just trying to plan for uncertainty and that means plans can change week to week and day to day. It will be at least the end of September before patterns emerge and adequate feedback gathered."

With students due to return on September 21st, at least a couple of weeks later than usual, there isn't the usual buzz of activity around campus and sports clubs have no firm idea of their likely intake.

"We'd normally have a week or two of recruitment activity when students sign up with clubs and we won't know until then if sufficient numbers have registered to make activities viable.

"It's an unclear picture. UCD are expecting 60 to 70 per cent of undergraduates or 80 per cent of postgraduates but I'm not sure where those numbers are going to come from."

Although several sports have resumed activities, there has been an impermanent feel to the schedules with the shadow of shutdowns, caused by Covid-19 infection, ever present.

Mullins can, however, point to some encouraging signs within UCD in recent weeks despite the ongoing difficulties and he believes that the specific attraction of sporting involvement may be a factor in attracting students to the university.

"There's definitely uncertainty about presence on campus but our rugby club here have been training for a number of weeks now and they're getting full turnouts and students preparing for the coming season are enjoying it and want to continue - no different to GAA clubs around the country. Everybody wants to play and everybody wants to be involved. Students are no different.

"Our soccer team are competing in the League of Ireland and fulfilling fixtures as normal and our famous Super League, which was cut short in March, has been picking up again and playing matches for the past couple of weeks.

"We anticipate that of all the reasons students might come to campus, participation in sport could well be significant driver."

On the national https://stvlive.co/ stage, debate about splitting the season between club and county has been dominating the non-pandemic conversation - even if the unplanned for trial played out this year in response to the restrictions of lockdown.

He's not inclined to day-dream about whether the notional new structure might benefit third-level Gaelic games by clearing more time at the start of the year even supposing the virus was to disappear in the morning.

"There's nothing going to be gone in the morning - or in a month. This pandemic is here to stay and as the WHO say, it'll be 18 months or two years before we're going to be able to plan normal activities."

Clearly sceptical about whether the split season will prove to be a panacea, he nonetheless welcomes the opportunity being taken to innovate.

"The pandemic has accommodated people improvising and thinking outside the box generally but I still think it's too early to say whether it's good or bad."
Merit of split season

Yet Mullins believes in the benefits of change and constant reappraisal.

"Back in the day when they introduced the back door and began tinkering with the All-Ireland series you got all sorts of people criticising and saying it was madness. I wasn't in that camp because I think change and adjusting is a good thing and I think those changes were good.

"Split season or dilution of the provincial championships, I don't have a strong opinion. I heard a discussion on the radio about the future of the provincial championships and my own view is that the extent to which change is possible while keeping them is debatable."

He has also had the opportunity for hands-on involvement as manager of St Vincent's footballers, who have reached the semi-finals of this year's championship, and appreciates the engagement that at one stage didn't seem possible.

"It was the only thing that was allowed and something that people welcomed in lockdown because it provided some light at the end of the tunnel. There were plenty of people doubting that it would get up and running the way it has. But I see this year as a temporary means of living with the pandemic in 2020 and that it's a once-off."

But did he not enjoy it with unhindered access to players and nice weather for a change?

"I've always enjoyed club activity! The way lockdown was going in April, we're lucky to have it.""
Bar Cricket all BUCS in the UK have been suspended until January. Thats not to say that training will not happen and challenge games etc won't happen but the leagues won't start until second term. That I believe for the current year may very well be what will happen in Ireland for Universities with the GAA. However I get the sense that once club activity is completed the GAA will shut down all club games and training but what they do with Third Level is another matter. The season this year suits Uni activity only starting in Jan given the inter-county is not due to finish until December.
Creating a window for Third Level in Jan Feb may also throw open the question as to what is value of the leagues in the first term. Would they be better focused on inter faculty competitions and building participation in the GAA in the college as opposed to an Elite level focus straight away. The challenge would be say what about hurling in LIT, perhaps its playing 7s with its closest colleges? there are challenges to the concept but all the colleges have been as guilty as focusing on the Elite in GAA perhaps also its time to create a balance within and encourage participation which could help reduce dropout numbers."
What is/are BUCS?"]British Universities & Colleges Sports. Its the governing body that covers all Third Level Sports in the UK. Its a pretty good concept. Each sports organisation runs their own competitions within it but have to fit into a certain criteria and at the end of each year there is an overall winner when all sports are taken into account. One website where all fixtures etc are on. Its one thing I think the Unis & Colleges in Ireland could look at copying."]There is Student Sports Ireland but it needs to get more sports under its control
link

KillingFields (Limerick) - Posts: 1371 - 31/08/2020 12:23:18    2289924

Link

Replying To zinny:  "
Replying To Cockney_Cat:  "[quote=zinny:  "[quote=stvlive:  "With all of the focus currently aimed at the return of schools and the sharp intakes of breath concerning its prospects of success, the situation for third-level education hasn't yet triggered the same level of interest.

Given the widespread deployment of remote learning during the national lockdown and the expectation that it will continue to play a significant role in the sector, there is in parallel little clarity as to how third-level sport will function in this new reality.

The past academic year saw its sporting activities, like everything else, brought to a shuddering halt in mid-March and adjourned sine die.

This year, Brian Mullins - one of the most recognisable names in sport, as a key figure in Dublin's All-Ireland winning sides of the 1970s and '80s - marks 20 years as UCD's director of sport and he sees the landscape as too difficult to assess with any conviction, as coronavirus shows little sign of abating.

"I'm involved with an organisation, called Student Sport Ireland, which has 30-plus educational institutions in its membership. We're all just trying to plan for uncertainty and that means plans can change week to week and day to day. It will be at least the end of September before patterns emerge and adequate feedback gathered."

With students due to return on September 21st, at least a couple of weeks later than usual, there isn't the usual buzz of activity around campus and sports clubs have no firm idea of their likely intake.

"We'd normally have a week or two of recruitment activity when students sign up with clubs and we won't know until then if sufficient numbers have registered to make activities viable.

"It's an unclear picture. UCD are expecting 60 to 70 per cent of undergraduates or 80 per cent of postgraduates but I'm not sure where those numbers are going to come from."

Although several sports have resumed activities, there has been an impermanent feel to the schedules with the shadow of shutdowns, caused by Covid-19 infection, ever present.

Mullins can, however, point to some encouraging signs within UCD in recent weeks despite the ongoing difficulties and he believes that the specific attraction of sporting involvement may be a factor in attracting students to the university.

"There's definitely uncertainty about presence on campus but our rugby club here have been training for a number of weeks now and they're getting full turnouts and students preparing for the coming season are enjoying it and want to continue - no different to GAA clubs around the country. Everybody wants to play and everybody wants to be involved. Students are no different.

"Our soccer team are competing in the League of Ireland and fulfilling fixtures as normal and our famous Super League, which was cut short in March, has been picking up again and playing matches for the past couple of weeks.

"We anticipate that of all the reasons students might come to campus, participation in sport could well be significant driver."

On the national https://stvlive.co/ stage, debate about splitting the season between club and county has been dominating the non-pandemic conversation - even if the unplanned for trial played out this year in response to the restrictions of lockdown.

He's not inclined to day-dream about whether the notional new structure might benefit third-level Gaelic games by clearing more time at the start of the year even supposing the virus was to disappear in the morning.

"There's nothing going to be gone in the morning - or in a month. This pandemic is here to stay and as the WHO say, it'll be 18 months or two years before we're going to be able to plan normal activities."

Clearly sceptical about whether the split season will prove to be a panacea, he nonetheless welcomes the opportunity being taken to innovate.

"The pandemic has accommodated people improvising and thinking outside the box generally but I still think it's too early to say whether it's good or bad."
Merit of split season

Yet Mullins believes in the benefits of change and constant reappraisal.

"Back in the day when they introduced the back door and began tinkering with the All-Ireland series you got all sorts of people criticising and saying it was madness. I wasn't in that camp because I think change and adjusting is a good thing and I think those changes were good.

"Split season or dilution of the provincial championships, I don't have a strong opinion. I heard a discussion on the radio about the future of the provincial championships and my own view is that the extent to which change is possible while keeping them is debatable."

He has also had the opportunity for hands-on involvement as manager of St Vincent's footballers, who have reached the semi-finals of this year's championship, and appreciates the engagement that at one stage didn't seem possible.

"It was the only thing that was allowed and something that people welcomed in lockdown because it provided some light at the end of the tunnel. There were plenty of people doubting that it would get up and running the way it has. But I see this year as a temporary means of living with the pandemic in 2020 and that it's a once-off."

But did he not enjoy it with unhindered access to players and nice weather for a change?

"I've always enjoyed club activity! The way lockdown was going in April, we're lucky to have it.""
Bar Cricket all BUCS in the UK have been suspended until January. Thats not to say that training will not happen and challenge games etc won't happen but the leagues won't start until second term. That I believe for the current year may very well be what will happen in Ireland for Universities with the GAA. However I get the sense that once club activity is completed the GAA will shut down all club games and training but what they do with Third Level is another matter. The season this year suits Uni activity only starting in Jan given the inter-county is not due to finish until December.
Creating a window for Third Level in Jan Feb may also throw open the question as to what is value of the leagues in the first term. Would they be better focused on inter faculty competitions and building participation in the GAA in the college as opposed to an Elite level focus straight away. The challenge would be say what about hurling in LIT, perhaps its playing 7s with its closest colleges? there are challenges to the concept but all the colleges have been as guilty as focusing on the Elite in GAA perhaps also its time to create a balance within and encourage participation which could help reduce dropout numbers."
What is/are BUCS?"]British Universities & Colleges Sports. Its the governing body that covers all Third Level Sports in the UK. Its a pretty good concept. Each sports organisation runs their own competitions within it but have to fit into a certain criteria and at the end of each year there is an overall winner when all sports are taken into account. One website where all fixtures etc are on. Its one thing I think the Unis & Colleges in Ireland could look at copying."]There is a governing body in Ireland covering some third level sports
link
But it doesnt govern enough sports and should be expanded

KillingFields (Limerick) - Posts: 1371 - 31/08/2020 12:42:58    2289931

Link

Replying To royaldunne:  "Entitled to ur opinion. Look when Andy took over we were pretty much rudderless, has thing's gone as quickly as he or I or anyone in Meath would have liked ? Nope. But we getting there. He has introduced new young players while slowly moving on. Unlike the chop and change that put us in this position in first place. Keoghan has gotten better which very few thought he could, menton came back and is now a proper midfielder, Newman has also recaptured his game, Conlon (19) walsh (18) been brought in at them ages and are been slowly turned into first team starters. Campion same, McGill and lavin are two of the top defenders in country. We still have a major goalkeeping problem in the form of kick outs. Without doubt that is the number one issue that needs to be sorted. Going forward we will get there under Andy. It may take another year or two. But we are getting there."
I'd be worried about McEntee tactically. When we played you in Navan back in the spring there was a gale blowing in your favour in the first half. The very obvious tactic for Meath was to apply a full press on Donegal and try to maximize the wind advantage first half. But Meath sat back and let our lads pretty much work the ball out of our half through the hands at our leisure. In the end up we won pulling up by about 10 points.

Lockjaw (Donegal) - Posts: 7015 - 01/09/2020 13:58:38    2290079

Link